Military

D-Day at 70 

Remembering the most brilliantly conducted invasion in military history by Victor Davis Hanson // National Review Online General Eisenhower speaks with paratroopers prior to the invasion. (Photo via Library of Congress) Seventy years ago this June 6, the Americans, British, and Canadians stormed the beaches of Normandy in the largest amphibious invasion of Europe since …

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“The End of Sparta” — A Review

A classicist’s exemplary historical novel. by Albert Louis Zambone // BooksandCulture.com Classicists should infuriate other humanists, in the way that the handsome scholar-athlete who volunteers to help dyslexic children and is a genuinely nice guy should infuriate the guy who just made it onto the football team and has a hard time keeping up his …

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Brave New World

by Victor Davis Hanson PJ Media The Revolutions We Missed Sometimes societies just plod along, oblivious that the world is being reinvented right under their noses. In 2000, one never saw pedestrians bumping into themselves as they glued their noses to iPhones. Share This

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Women at the Front

by Victor Davis Hanson NRO’s The Corner Ostensibly, there are really only two issues about the inclusion of women in combat units: one, apparently the nation believes that it will react to the future combat deaths or capture of women in ground units the same way it does to the loss of male soldiers, even …

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T-Ball War in the Middle East

by Victor Davis Hanson Tribune Media Services Classical explanations of conventional wars run something like this: An aggressor state seeks political advantage through military force. It has a hunch that the threatened target will likely either make concessions to avoid losing a war, or, if war breaks out, the resulting political gains will be worth …

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Thoughts on the Rhine

by Victor Davis Hanson PJ Media Editor’s note: Recently, VDH led a group on a tour of the Rhine and wrote these thoughts. Rhine Watching Share This

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Winning Battles, Losing Wars

by Victor Davis Hanson PJ Media Can We Still Win Wars? Given that the United States fields the costliest, most sophisticated, and most lethal military in the history of civilization, that should be a silly question. Share This

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More Rubble, Less Trouble

by Victor Davis Hanson Defining Ideas Western Warfare, as originated by the Greeks and systematized by the Romans, took various forms over the ensuing two millennia. European militaries put greater emphasis on decisive battles such as Gaugamela or Kursk. They focused on collective discipline, the importance of staying in rank, superior technology, and logistics. Share …

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Taking Out Dictators

by Victor Davis Hanson National Review Online In the past 40 years, the United States has intervened to go after autocrats in Afghanistan, Grenada, Haiti, Iraq, Libya, Panama, Somalia, and Serbia. We have attacked by air, by land, and by a combination of both. Share This

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