WWII

The Bombs of August

Victor Davis Hanson // National Review On Aug. 6, 1945, the United States dropped a uranium-fueled atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan. Three days later, another U.S. Army Air Forces B-29 repeated the attack on Nagasaki, Japan, with an even more powerful plutonium bomb. Less than a month after the second bombing, Imperial Japan agreed to …

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Civilization’s ‘Darkest Hour’ Hits the Silver Screen

  by Victor Davis Hanson//National Review A masterful new film shows how Churchill saved the world from Nazi Germany in May of 1940.   The new film Darkest Hour offers the diplomatic side to the recent action movie Dunkirk.   The story unfolds with the drama of British prime minister Winston Churchill’s assuming power during …

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The Bigmouth Tradition of American Leadership

by Victor Davis Hanson // National Review   To everything, there is a season.   America has always enjoyed two antithetical traditions in its political and military heroes.   The preferred style is the reticent, sober, and competent executive planner as president or general, from Herbert Hoover to Gerald Ford to Jimmy Carter.   George …

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The War of Wars Analyzed to the Third Decimal Place

Santa’s Book Bag By Larry Thornberry // The American Spectator A magnificent contribution from Victor Davis Hanson. The Second World Wars: How the First Global Conflict Was Fought and Won By Victor Davis Hanson (Basic Books, 652 pages, $40) Yes, Virginia, after thousands of books, lectures, debates, veteran memoirs, and documentaries, there is still something …

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Axis powers miscalculated after early advantages in World War II, Stanford scholar says

  Axis powers miscalculated after early advantages in World War II, Stanford scholar says By 1942, the Axis powers seemed invincible. But the course of the war soon changed in ways that offer lessons for the U.S. and its allies in today’s world, said Victor Davis Hanson, a Hoover Institution senior fellow. By Clifton B. …

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Pearl Harbor and the Legacy of Carl Vinson

by Victor Davis Hanson // National Review Read the original article here.  His monumental contributions to American security are largely unknown to Americans today. Seventy-six years ago on Dec. 7, 1941, the Imperial Japanese fleet surprise-attacked Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, the home port of the U.S. Pacific Fleet. Japanese carrier planes killed 2,403 Americans. They sunk or …

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China’s New Greater East Asia Co-Prosperity Sphere

by Victor Davis Hanson// National Review   China is following the same path to regional hegemony that Japan did in the 1930s.   A few weeks ago, Chinese president Xi Jinping offered a Soviet-style five-year plan for China’s progress at the Communist Party congress in Beijing. Despite his talk of global cooperation, the themes were …

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