Victor Davis Hanson Private Papers

In the Jaws of Sharia: The Liberal and the Temptress

by Raymond Ibrahim

Private Papers

Editor’s Note: These postings were taken from Jihad Watch and Pajamas Media, internet journals in which the author posts frequently. Ibrahim’s observations below remind us of the depths of Dante’s Inferno where the three-headed devil masticates the worst criminals of Dante’s imagination: Brutus and Cassius are second only to Judas. Among Muslims, second only to Christians are women and secularists. 

Muslim Brotherhood: Only “Drunks, Druggies and Adulterers” Reject Sharia

Egypt’s Muslim Brotherhood just made a few assertions that have ruffled the nation’s secular and Christian populace.

At a conference attended by some 5,000, Senior Muslim Brotherhood leader, Dr. Essam el-Erian, Vice President of the “Freedom and Justice” party, the Brotherhood’s political wing, declared that “No one in Egypt — not a Copt, a liberal, a leftist, no one — dares say they are against Islam and the application of Sharia: all say they want the Islamic Sharia [applied]. And when referendum time comes, whoever says ‘we do not want Sharia’ will expose their hidden intentions.”

He went on to threaten Egypt’s Supreme Council of Armed Forces with “massacres” if it interfered in politics and Islam’s role in the constitution and addressed the nation’s Coptic Christians as follows: “You will never find a strong fortress for your faith and rights except in Islam and Sharia,” adding, “Our Lord has commanded us to be just, and we have learned it from Islam. We do not wish to hurt anyone…”

More to the point, his Brotherhood colleague, Sheikh Sayyid Abdul Karim, asserted: “Those who do not wish to see Islam [Sharia] applied are drunks, druggies, adulterers, and brothel-owners.”

While such talk is commonplace among Egypt’s self-styled Salafists, it is significant that the Muslim Brotherhood, which has mastered the art of stealth, the art of appearing “moderate” — to the point that President Obama’s intelligence chief described them as “largely secular” — is beginning to feel comfortable enough to let snippets of the truth come out.

Saudi Arabia: Women Must Cover Provocative Eyes

According to a report that appeared on Al Arabiyya News, Saudi Arabia’s Commission for the Promotion of Virtue and Prevention of Vice has confirmed that it will begin “interfering with” and “ordering” women to cover their eyes, “if they provoke fitna [temptation, sedition, etc].” The spokesman added, “Our men have every right to do so.” The picture is a video snapshot from the TV report.

Egypt: Women Herded and Tied Like Camels?

This picture, taken at a recent protest in Egypt, has been making the rounds on various Arabic websites. Note the rope around the women, herding them like camels; note the man to the right holding the leash, walking them.

I am told this is a common “precautionary measure” to keep women from mixing with men during protests.

Considering that certain Islamic texts describe females as “she-camels in heat,” or that it is traditional for some men to divorce their wives by saying “you are given free rein and unloosed like that camel,” or that Muslims are thought to have a mind-frame rooted in sand, camels, and ropes—this measure must surely seem natural.

At any rate, to those who think that history must always progress, take note: fifty years ago, the overwhelming majority of women in Egypt wore modern cloths, hair uncovered, and would never have condescended to being walked on a leash.

Such is “progress”—”Arab Spring” style.

©2011 Raymond Ibrahim

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About Victor Davis Hanson

Victor Davis Hanson is the Martin and Illie Anderson Senior Fellow in Residence in Classics and Military History at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University, a professor of Classics Emeritus at California State University, Fresno, and a nationally syndicated columnist for Tribune Media Services. He is also the Wayne & Marcia Buske Distinguished Fellow in History, Hillsdale College, where he teaches each fall semester courses in military history and classical culture.

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