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Where’s The Letter From Democratic Security Officials Opposing Hillary?

By Victor Davis Hanson//Town Hall

A group of 50 conservative foreign policy elites and veteran national security officials of prior Republican administrations recently wrote an open letter denouncing Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump.

They cited especially his lack of character and moral authority — and his “little understanding of America’s national interests.” Particularly bothersome, they wrote, is Trump’s inability “to separate truth from falsehood.”

The letter stated that Trump’s one-year campaign of blustery rhetoric suggests he could be as reckless in deed in the White House as he has been in word on the campaign trail.

Is there a like group of past Democratic wise men and women who can commensurately “police their own” and so warn us about Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton?

Unlike Trump, Clinton already has an actual political record as a former U.S. senator and secretary of state.

If there were such a group, the heart of their letter might read something like the following:

“We the undersigned who have served in prior Democratic administrations will not vote for Hillary Clinton. Read more →

The Great Regression

Today, it seems that Orwell’s 1984 would better have been titled 2016.

By Victor Davis Hanson // National Review Online

The Betrayal of the Intellectuals?

After nearly eight years of aiding and abetting Obama, leftists now fear the possible constitutional overreach of our next president.

By Victor Davis Hanson // National Review Online

The Immigrant’s Dilemma

Defining Ideas

Image credit:

Barbara Kelley

Nearly a half-century ago, Bob Dylan wrote a mixed ode to the immigrant, in a way that no doubt might earn him charges of racism, nativism, and xenophobia in today’s politically-correct age. Yet Dylan was trying to express the paradoxes of leaving one’s homeland for an entirely new political and cultural landscape that often overwhelms the newcomer. “I pity the poor immigrant,” he sang, “Who wishes he would’ve stayed home.”

Never has the immigrant to the West been more confused. In the twenty-first century, immigration almost always moves in a single direction—poor and desperate non-Western people abandon their homes in Latin America, Africa, and Asia seemingly to join quite different cultures in Europe and the United States. The West has neither the population growth nor the poverty any more to send huddled masses to the new lands. And yet, today, these immigrants arrive in Western countries that are strange fantasylands compared to what they were expecting. The newcomer is rarely reminded of why he left home, or why, after doing so, he chose the West, and not Russia, China, Bolivia, or the Sudan for his destination.

Western governments and the larger culture could easily instruct the immigrant that the Western tradition is far more likely to embrace constitutional government, personal freedom, free-market economics, the importance of private property, religious tolerance, free expression, due process, an independent judiciary, and a larger culture of self-criticism and introspection. But to do so would put the lie to multiculturalism and the belief in different but equal cultures.

These precise Western values allow the immigrant to enjoy a security, affluence, and freedom unknown in his abandoned homeland. Yet, we, the host, prefer not to “judge” those other places, and thus do not fully embrace the immigrant’s ostensible wish to become one of us. We dare not ethnocentrically elevate our culture over others. Instead, we rebrand the human sins of slavery, sexism, and racism as uniquely Western depravities rather than age-old pathologies that predated the West and still exist unchecked outside it. The immigrant immediately senses that his troubled Western host is not so much privileged as unsure and unhappy—and ripe for psychological exploitation. Hyphenation and tribalism, not the melting pot, are often seen as the natural, expected and more “authentic” path for the recently arrived.
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Hillary’s Neoliberals

Some Republicans have cultural and political affinities that are pulling them away from Trump and toward Clinton.

By Victor Davis Hanson //National Review Online

Trump vs. Trump

Can Trump get out of the trap of running against himself?

By Victor Davis Hanson // National Review Online

Donald Trump, Postmodern Candidate

Trump defies all political orthodoxy and confounds any attempts at explanation or prediction.

By Victor Davis Hanson // National Review Online

A Convention of the Absurd

The Democratic Convention was an exercise in absurdist theater.

By Victor Davis Hanson // National Review Online

Why borders matter — and a borderless world is a fantasy

By Victor Davis Hanson // Los Angeles Times

Borders are in the news as never before. With Muslim refugees flooding into the European Union from the Middle East, and with terrorism on the rise, a popular revolt is taking shape against the so-called Schengen Area agreements, which give free rights of movement within Europe. The European masses are not racists, but they now apparently wish to accept Middle Eastern immigrants only to the degree that these newcomers arrive legally and promise to become European in values and outlook—protocols that the EU essentially discarded decades ago as intolerant. Europeans are relearning that the continent’s external borders mark off very different approaches to culture and society from what prevails in North Africa or the Middle East. Read more →

Douglas MacArthur’s Brilliant, Controversial Legacy

A new biography examines the many sides of the versatile American general.

By Victor Davis Hanson // National Review Online
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