Victor Davis Hanson Private Papers

Author Archives: Victor Davis Hanson

Victor Davis Hanson is the Martin and Illie Anderson Senior Fellow in Residence in Classics and Military History at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University, a professor of Classics Emeritus at California State University, Fresno, and a nationally syndicated columnist for Tribune Media Services. He is also the Wayne & Marcia Buske Distinguished Fellow in History, Hillsdale College, where he teaches each fall semester courses in military history and classical culture.

Thicker Than Oil

Putting to rest the Left’s Iraq deceptions.

by Victor Davis Hanson

National Review Online

It has now been almost a year since the liberation of Iraq, the fury of the antiwar rallies, and the publicized hectoring of Michael Moore, Noam Chomsky, Sean Penn, and other assorted conspiracy freaks — and we have enough evidence to lay some of their myths to rest. Read more →

Grammatical Gymnastics at the New Yorker Magazine

by Victor Davis Hanson

Private Papers

In a recent review of Donald Kagan’s The Peloponnesian War, and my Autumn of War, (“Theatres of War:  Why the battles over ancient Athens still rage” New Yorker Magazine, [January 12, 2004]), the classicist Daniel Mendelsohn  says that I believe that it is immoral to suggest defeat can be seen as victory: “The play asks the very question that Victor Davis Hanson considers “immoral”: whether abject defeat can yet somehow be a victory.” Read more →

Do We Want to Go Back?

What to remember come November.

by Victor Davis Hanson

National Review Online

The great accomplishment of the Truman administration was containment — especially the creation of a policy to ensure that Soviet Communism did not enter Western Europe. Critics on the right once argued over “Who lost China and Eastern Europe?” Read more →

How to Beat the American Military?

When you can’t face it in battle.

by Victor Davis Hanson

Private Papers

There is a growing consensus that it is near suicide to face the United States in a conventional war. Both the long history of western warfare, and a variety of recent encounters—whether in the Falklands, the Gulf, or the Middle East—remind us that Western militaries are able to project lethal force (often at quite formidable distances from home) in ways that are not explicable by their often small populations and territories. Read more →

Words That Don’t Matter

The new buss vocabulary of anti-Americanism.

by Victor Davis Hanson

National Review Online

“Preemption” is supposed to be the new slur. Its use now conjures up all sorts of Dr. Strangelove images to denigrate the present “trigger-happy” Bush administration. Read more →

The Coming of Nemesis

Hubris and the law of unintended consequences.

by Victor Davis Hanson

National Review Online

Irony, paradox, hubris, and nemesis are all Greek words. They reflect an early Western fascination with natural, immutable laws of destiny, perhaps akin to something like the eastern idea of karma — that excess and haughtiness can set off a chain of events that are neither predicable nor welcome. Read more →

Just Imagine . . .

Trying to believe in the make-believe world of the present age.

by Victor Davis Hanson

National Review Online

After listening to a variety of American, Middle Eastern, and European pundits, I wish that their understanding of the way the world works were true — or at least even that they believed it to be true. If so, just imagine the following… Read more →

Weapons of Mass Hysteria

If anything, the war was about 100,000 corpses too late.

by Victor Davis Hanson

National Review Online

The United States has lost less than 350 American dead in actual combat in Iraq, deposed the worst tyrant on the planet, and offered the first real hope of a humane government in the recent history of the Middle East — and is being roundly condemned rather than praised for one of the most remarkable occurrences of our age. Yet a careful postbellum anatomy of the recent WMD controversy makes the original case for the war stronger rather weaker. Read more →

The Mind of Our Enemies

Sorting out all the agendas in Iraq.

by Victor Davis Hanson

National Review Online

“It is easy to be against the war now,” boasts Howard Dean, as he goes on to describe Iraq as a hopeless quagmire. Read more →

Better or Worse?

Should we believe the gloom of the Democrats?

by Victor Davis Hanson

National Review Online

Thematic in the Democratic primary campaign is that the United States is worse off now than it was before the invasion of Iraq. The harangues from some of the candidates have been quite unbelievable: Saddam Hussein’s capture did little to improve our security; we cannot prejudge bin Laden’s guilt; we are less safe than ever before and hated to boot; and so on. Read more →

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