Victor Davis Hanson Private Papers

Author Archives: Victor Davis Hanson

Victor Davis Hanson is the Martin and Illie Anderson Senior Fellow in Residence in Classics and Military History at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University, a professor of Classics Emeritus at California State University, Fresno, and a nationally syndicated columnist for Tribune Media Services. He is also the Wayne & Marcia Buske Distinguished Fellow in History, Hillsdale College, where he teaches each fall semester courses in military history and classical culture.

Idealism and Its Discontents: Thinking on the Neoconservative Slur

by Victor Davis Hanson

National Review Online

Neo- is a prefix that derives from the Greek adjective veos — “new” or “fresh” — and in theory it is used inexactly for those conservatives who once were not — or for those who have reinterpreted conservatism in terms of a more idealistic foreign policy that eschewed both Cold War realpolitik and the hallowed traditions of American republican isolationism. Read more →

Will Abbas Bring an End to Conflict?

Abbas must stop the murder of Israelis

by Bruce S. Thornton

Private Papers

Just as in the days after the death of Arafat, the Palestinian elections have sparked an outburst of international optimism that perhaps the Israeli-Palestinian conflict can begin to be resolved. Read more →

Islamicists hate us for who we are, not what we do

by Victor Davis Hanson

Chicago Tribune Co.

As the third recent Middle East election nears in Iraq, Americans are still puzzled over why well-off Islamic fundamentalists crashed planes into skyscrapers and now send mercenaries to the Sunni Triangle to slaughter us as we sponsor democracy. Read more →

Triangulating the War

Yesterday’s genius, today’s fool, tomorrow’s what?

by Victor Davis Hanson

National Review Online

Reading the pages of foreign-policy journals, between the long tracts on Bush’s “failures” and neoconservative “arrogance,” one encounters mostly predictions of defeat and calls for phased withdrawal — always with resounding criticism of the American “botched” occupation. Read more →

Heartbreak Aside, Iraq Progresses

by Victor Davis Hanson

This column was syndicated by the Herald Tribune Co. and appeared in newspapers last weekend.

This New Year, Americans should reflect on what we have accomplished in more than three years of hard war since being attacked on Sept. 11. The Taliban and Saddam Hussein are gone — but without the envisioned millions of refugees and hundreds of thousands of dead. Read more →

Fighting for Free Speech

FIRE’s guide to defending student rights on campuses

by Bruce S. Thornton

Private Papers

If you have a child in college the most important book you both should read is available free of charge. Read more →

The Disenchanted American

Are we growing world-weary?

by Victor Davis Hanson

National Review Online

There is a new strange mood of acceptance among Americans about the world beyond our shores. Of course, we are not becoming naïve isolationists of 1930s vintage, who believe that we are safe by ourselves inside fortress America — not after September 11. Read more →

This is Your Wake-up Call

Jared Diamond can’t find the key to superior civilization.

by Bruce S. Thornton

Private Papers

UCLA professor Jared Diamond’s journey into academic superstardom was jump-started when President Clinton held up Diamond’s 1999 Guns Germs and Steel before the news cameras, after which bestseller status and numerous prizes, including the Pulitzer, followed. Read more →

Into the Tar Pits: Dinosaurs Either Evolve or Die

by Victor Davis Hanson

National Review Online

There was a time when the political lines about foreign policy were well drawn. Those on the Left felt that American democracy and global capitalism did not necessarily offer the rest of the world a much better alternative than either Soviet-sponsored Communism or third-world thuggery. Read more →

Our Challenges in the Year Ahead

What we learned from three years of war.

by Victor Davis Hanson

Private Papers

A shorter version of this essay recently appeared in the Australian Financial Review. Read more →

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