Victor Davis Hanson Private Papers

Author Archives: Victor Davis Hanson

Victor Davis Hanson is the Martin and Illie Anderson Senior Fellow in Residence in Classics and Military History at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University, a professor of Classics Emeritus at California State University, Fresno, and a nationally syndicated columnist for Tribune Media Services. He is also the Wayne & Marcia Buske Distinguished Fellow in History, Hillsdale College, where he teaches each fall semester courses in military history and classical culture.

The Perfect Storm of Hating Bush: Part III

by Victor Davis Hanson

This series written for Private Papers will appear in four parts.

Part Three
The wages of postmodernism, or when facts do not exist,
we can invent our own reality

Remember the preexisting landscape of postmodern thinking of the last two decades that has dominated the intelligentsia, specifically the Foucauldian notion that there is no real absolute standard of good or bad, right or wrong, but simply interpretations and views, whose ‘correctness’ is predicated on the nature of power. Read more →

Kerry, Captive

An anatomy of flip-flopping.

by Victor Davis Hanson

National Review Online

There is a logic to Senator Kerry’s flip-flopping that transcends his political opportunism: He is simply a captive of the pulse of the battlefield, without any steady vision or historical sense that might put the carnage of the day into some larger tactical, strategic, or political framework. Read more →

The Perfect Storm of Hating Bush: Part II

by Victor Davis Hanson

This is the second of four parts written for Private Papers.

Part Two
Why the new hysterical hatred?

There are a variety of ways to account for this unhinged hatred detailed in “The new candor about killing George Bush.” Read more →

Spread Democracy

What to ask John Kerry

by Victor Davis Hanson

New York Times

The New York Times asked a few leading commentators to pose questions to President Bush and Senator Kerry at the first debate on September 30th, 2004. Read more →

The Perfect Storm of Hating Bush: Part I

by Victor Davis Hanson

This series written for Private Papers will appear in four parts.

Part One
The new candor about killing George Bush

The American Left has become increasingly hysterical since September 11th. Read more →

The Fall

A bankrupt generation is fading away.

by Victor Davis Hanson

National Review Online

Dan Rather’s initial, furious street-side defense of an amateurish forgery — smug, huffy, self-righteous — brings to mind one of those bad movies about the Paris barricades, especially the grainy, black-and-white shots of powdered and wigged aristocrats on their way to the Guillotine, yelling out of their carriages at pitchfork-carrying peasants. Read more →

A Futile Foreign Policy

by Victor Davis Hanson

National Review Magazine

This essay appeared in the September 7, 2004 National Review Magazine.

John Kerry is worried about his record of support for gay unions, abortion-on-demand, and other hot-button liberal causes that rile moderate swing voters outside of New England. Read more →

See Ya, Iraq?

Leaving now would be a disaster.

by Victor Davis Hanson

National Review Online

“War is a series of catastrophes that results in victory.” — Georges Clemenceau Read more →

Our Moral Quagmire

by Victor Davis Hanson

Private Papers

Recently there was a demonstration not far from my home in central California. A number of illegal aliens were marching to demand the right to obtain California driver’s licenses. Their shrill advocates on television claimed that illegal residents of the state were willing to put up with demeaning questions about their legal status—but only if it meant in exchange gaining sanction to drive and obtain government identification. Read more →

The Other Olympics

Why so little anti-Americanism?

by Victor Davis Hanson

Private Papers

Well apart from the obvious lessons of the recent Olympic games that the amazing Greeks really did pull it off at the eleventh hour without major terrorist incidents, there was another story that remained largely ignored. Read more →

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