Category Archives: February 2004

How to Beat the American Military?

When you can’t face it in battle.

by Victor Davis Hanson

Private Papers

There is a growing consensus that it is near suicide to face the United States in a conventional war. Both the long history of western warfare, and a variety of recent encounters—whether in the Falklands, the Gulf, or the Middle East—remind us that Western militaries are able to project lethal force (often at quite formidable distances from home) in ways that are not explicable by their often small populations and territories. Read more →

Words That Don’t Matter

The new buss vocabulary of anti-Americanism.

by Victor Davis Hanson

National Review Online

“Preemption” is supposed to be the new slur. Its use now conjures up all sorts of Dr. Strangelove images to denigrate the present “trigger-happy” Bush administration. Read more →

The Coming of Nemesis

Hubris and the law of unintended consequences.

by Victor Davis Hanson

National Review Online

Irony, paradox, hubris, and nemesis are all Greek words. They reflect an early Western fascination with natural, immutable laws of destiny, perhaps akin to something like the eastern idea of karma — that excess and haughtiness can set off a chain of events that are neither predicable nor welcome. Read more →

Just Imagine . . .

Trying to believe in the make-believe world of the present age.

by Victor Davis Hanson

National Review Online

After listening to a variety of American, Middle Eastern, and European pundits, I wish that their understanding of the way the world works were true — or at least even that they believed it to be true. If so, just imagine the following… Read more →

Weapons of Mass Hysteria

If anything, the war was about 100,000 corpses too late.

by Victor Davis Hanson

National Review Online

The United States has lost less than 350 American dead in actual combat in Iraq, deposed the worst tyrant on the planet, and offered the first real hope of a humane government in the recent history of the Middle East — and is being roundly condemned rather than praised for one of the most remarkable occurrences of our age. Yet a careful postbellum anatomy of the recent WMD controversy makes the original case for the war stronger rather weaker. Read more →

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