Category Archives: Wwii

Israeli Preemptive Action, Western Reaction

Israel Can’t Count on the West to Protect it. Will Israel do the unthinkable to stop the unimaginable?

by Victor Davis Hanson // National Review Online

Israeli Air Force F-16 fighter (Jack Guez/AFP/Getty)

Israeli Air Force F-16 fighter (Jack Guez/AFP/Getty)

The Obama administration seems peeved that almost everyone in Israel, left and right, has no use for the present Iranian–American deal to thwart Iran’s efforts to get the bomb.

Indeed, at times John Kerry has hinted darkly that Israel’s opposition to the pact might incur American wrath should the deal be tabled — even though Kerry knows that the polls show a clear majority of Americans being against the proposed agreement while remaining quite supportive of the Jewish state. President Obama, from time to time, suggests that his agreement is being sabotaged by nefarious lobbying groups, big-time check writers, and neoconservative supporters of the Iraq war — all shorthand, apparently, for pushy Jewish groups.

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Iran, the Munich Comparison, and the Abuse of History

The Iran Deal is not Munich, but the same foolishness of Western leaders is close enough to warn us what happens next. And it will not be good. 

by Victor Davis Hanson // PJ Media

obama_chamberlain_iran_8-2-15-1The Iranian deal has called to mind the Munich Agreement of 1938. Then Britain and France signed away the sovereignty of Czechoslovakia, in hopes that Adolf Hitler would be content with absorbing the German-speaking Sudetenland borderlands and cease further territorial acquisitions. But that appeasement only accelerated Nazi atrocities, from Kristallnacht at home to the dismemberment of all Czechoslovakia and, the next year, the invasion of Poland.

Is the Munich disaster a sound analogy for the current proposed agreement with Iran?

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The New World Map

by Victor Davis Hanson // TMS

Could World War II Have Ended Sooner than It Did?

by Victor Davis Hanson // National Review Online

Why America Was Indispensable to the Allies’ Winning World War II

by Victor Davis Hanson // National Review Online

Our Dangerous Historical Moment

Obama and European leaders are repeating the mistakes of their 1930s predecessors.

by Victor Davis Hanson // National Review Online 

Photo via NRO

World War II was the most destructive war in history. What caused it?

The panic from the ongoing and worldwide Depression in the 1930s had empowered extremist movements the world over. Like-minded, violent dictators of otherwise quite different Nazi Germany, Fascist Italy, Imperial Japan, and the Communist Soviet Union all wanted to attack their neighbors.

Yet World War II could have been prevented had Western Europe united to deter Germany. Instead, France, Britain, and the smaller European democracies appeased Hitler.

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The Last Lion Remembered

Winston Churchill never once flinched in the face of the Third Reich.

by Victor Davis Hanson // National Review Online

Comparing the ‘war on terror’ with WWII

by Victor Davis Hanson // World Net Daily

(Pearl Harbor via WND)

(Pearl Harbor via WND)

Over the years I’ve debated scholars and pundits on issues ranging from illegal immigration (no to open borders), George Bush’s troop levels in Iraq (don’t add and don’t subtract, but change tactics and force the Iraqis to step up), and World War II (the Red Army, for all the savagery and ordeal on the Eastern front, was not mostly responsible for winning the war, and its soldiers were no more courageous than Americans at Bastogne, Normandy Beach, Iwo Jima or Okinawa).

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Bomb, Occupy, or Neither?

Blowing apart a problem for a while is different from ending it for good.

by Victor Davis Hanson // National Review Online

REAL REASON JAPANESE ATTACKED PEARL HARBOR

by Victor Davis Hanson // WND

Photo via WND

Photo via WND

The Japanese did not see their attack on Pearl Harbor as foolish at all. What in retrospect seems suicidal did not necessarily seem so at the time. In hindsight, the wiser Japanese course would have been to absorb the orphaned colonial Far Eastern possessions of France, the Netherlands and Great Britain that were largely defenseless after June 1941. By carefully avoiding the Philippines and Pearl Harbor, the Japanese might have inherited the European colonial empire in the Pacific without starting a war with the United States. And had the Japanese and Germans coordinated strategy, the two might have attacked Russia simultaneously in June 1941 without prompting a wider war with the United States, or in the case of Japan, an immediate conflict necessarily with Great Britain.

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