Category Archives: First Term Policies

For Obama, Inconvenient Law Is Irrelevant Law

The president dismantles immigration law that he finds incompatible with his own larger agenda.

(John Gress/Getty)

(John Gress/Getty)

by Victor Davis Hanson // National Review Online

The Madness of 2008

A nation became unhinged by trivialities like “hope and change.” It has now awakened.  

by Victor Davis Hanson // National Review Online

On the campaign trail, October 2008 (Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

On the campaign trail, October 2008 (Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

America is suddenly angry at the laxity, incompetence, and polarizing politics of the Obama administration, the bad optics of the president putting about in his bright golf clothes while the world burns. Certainly, no recent president has failed on so many fronts — honesty, transparency, truthfulness, the economy, foreign policy, the duties of the commander-in-chief, executive responsibilities, and spiritual leadership.

For those who are “shocked” at the present meltdown, of a magnitude not seen since the annus horribilis of 1979, in their defense: Obama certainly did not campaign on a new health-care plan that would force Americans to give up the doctors they liked and their existing coverage, while raising premiums and deductibles, while giving exemptions for insiders and cronies, and while raising the deficit.

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2014: Obama’s America

Scandals now come so fast that each new mess makes us forget the previous one.

by Victor Davis Hanson // National Review Online

How Obama Lost the Middle East

The president put politics and ideology ahead of preserving hard-won gains in the region. 

by Victor Davis Hanson // National Review Online

In his first term, Barack Obama all but declared victory in America’s Middle East struggles.

As he precipitously pulled out all U.S. peacekeepers from Iraq, the president had his own “Mission Accomplished” moment when declaring the country “stable,” “self-reliant,” and an “extraordinary achievement.”

Those claims echoed Vice President Joe Biden’s earlier boast that Iraq somehow would prove Obama’s “greatest achievement.”

After the death of Osama bin Laden, and during Obama’s reelection campaign, the president also proclaimed that al-Qaeda was a spent force and “on the run.”

But what exactly was the new Obama strategy that supposedly had all but achieved a victory in the larger War on Terror amid Middle East hostility?

Fuzzy euphemisms replaced supposedly hurtful terms such as “terrorism,” “jihadist,” and “Islamist.” The administration gave well-meaning speeches exaggerating Islamic achievement while citing past American culpability.

We tilted toward Turkey and the Palestinians while sternly lecturing Israel. Military victory was caricatured as an obsolete concept. Leading from behind was a clever substitute.

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The Federal Octopus

Federal agencies now exist not for the public good but for their employees’ benefit and Obama’s agenda.

by Victor Davis Hanson // National Review Online

Obama Is Just Obama

by Victor Davis Hanson

PJ Media

Suddenly, half the country is upset with Obama for the recent flurry of scandals. Even some in the media are perplexed Read more →

It Can Happen Here

by Victor Davis Hanson

PJ Media

Shortly before the second-term inauguration of Barack Obama this January, I wrote [1] the following of my worries over the Obama way of doing business: Read more →

The Democracy Delusion and Obama’s Failed Mideast Policy

by Bruce Thornton

Frontpage Magazine

The New York Times headline on Secretary of State Clinton’s visit to Egypt said it all: “US Is in a Quandary.” That’s putting it mildly. Better words for this administration’s foreign policy are “confused,” “contradictory,” and “delusional.” Read more →

Tuning Out a President

by Victor Davis Hanson

PJ Media

Tuned-out Presidents

Somewhere around early 2006, the nation tuned out George W. Bush for a variety of reasons, some warranted, but many not. Read more →

The Obama Foreign Policy

by Victor Davis Hanson

National Review Online

The 2012 election will hinge on the economy, not on US foreign policy, unless there is a major overseas crisis — an Israeli attack on Iran, an Iranian detonation of a nuclear weapon, a Middle East war, a North Korean attack, or something of that sort. Read more →

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